130th Ohio General Assembly
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S. C. R. No. 13  As Introduced
As Introduced

129th General Assembly
Regular Session
2011-2012
S. C. R. No. 13


Senator Tavares 

Cosponsors: Senators Sawyer, Kearney, Turner, Schiavoni 



A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION
To urge the Secretary of the United States Department of Health and Human Services to include all federally approved prescription contraceptive drugs and devices in the list of women's preventive health services that must be covered by new health insurance plans.


BE IT RESOLVED BY THE SENATE OF THE STATE OF OHIO
(THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES CONCURRING):


       WHEREAS, On March 23, 2010, President Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (P.L. 111-148) into law; and

       WHEREAS, Section 2713 of the Act requires new health insurance plans to cover women's preventive health care services and to do so without imposing any cost-sharing requirements on their members; and

       WHEREAS, The Act leaves it to the United States Department of Health and Human Services to define the specific preventive health care services for which benefits must be provided under Section 2713. The Department's decision is expected to be issued in the form of guidelines to supplement regulations that were promulgated under Section 2713 and issued on July 14, 2010; and

       WHEREAS, Congress's intent in requiring health insurance plans to cover preventive services was to encourage and invest in basic health care services to improve healthy outcomes for all Americans; and

       WHEREAS, Family planning services improve health care outcomes and wellness for women and families; and

       WHEREAS, According to the Guttmacher Policy Review, family planning enables women to better prevent unintended pregnancy and plan for pregnancy when they want to have a child. When women plan their pregnancies, they are more likely to seek prenatal care, improving their own health and the health of their children; and

       WHEREAS, According to the Guttmacher Institute, more than sixty per cent of women in the United States between the ages of fifteen and forty-four are currently using a contraceptive method; and

       WHEREAS, Based on data from the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth, ninety-eight per cent of sexually experienced women have used contraception at some point in their lives; and

       WHEREAS, On average, according to the Guttmacher Report on Public Policy, a woman spends thirty years of her life trying to avoid getting pregnant; and

       WHEREAS, Based on research conducted by Hart Research Associates and commissioned by the Planned Parenthood Action Fund in 2010, a majority of American voters (seventy-one per cent) say prescription birth control should be covered without any out-of-pocket costs; and

       WHEREAS, According to Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, in 2001 half of all pregnancies in the United States were unintended. Sixty-nine per cent of pregnancies among African-American women were unintended, fifty-four per cent of pregnancies among Latina women were unintended, and forty per cent of pregnancies among Caucasian women were unintended; and

       WHEREAS, Publicly funded family planning in the United States prevents nearly two million unintended pregnancies each year according to the Guttmacher Policy Review; and

       WHEREAS, In addition to the primary purpose of allowing women to plan and prepare for pregnancy, other health benefits of contraception include reduced risk of endometrial and ovarian cancers, ectopic pregnancy, iron deficiency anemia related to heavy menstruation, osteoporosis, ovarian cysts, and pelvic inflammatory disease; and

       WHEREAS, The impact of copayments and other cost-sharing requirements as a barrier to accessing affordable contraception is reflected in the following statistics: according to Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, half of all pregnancies in the United States each year are unintended and, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the United States consistently lags behind other developed nations in infant mortality rates, ranking thirtieth in the world in 2005; and

       WHEREAS, For every dollar invested in contraception, three dollars and seventy-four cents is saved in Medicaid expenditures for pregnancy-related care according to the Guttmacher Policy Review; and

       WHEREAS, The cost of prescription birth control is a major factor in consistent use of prescription birth control. Copayments for birth control pills typically range between fifteen dollars and fifty dollars per month, and for other methods, such as intrauterine devices, copayments and other out-of-pocket expenses can reach into the hundreds of dollars; and

       WHEREAS, Based on research conducted by Hart Research Associates and commissioned by the Planned Parenthood Action Fund in 2010, more than one-third (thirty-four per cent) of American women have struggled with the cost of prescription birth control at some point in their lives. The numbers are even more dramatic among younger women (ages eighteen to thirty-four), with more than half (fifty-five per cent) mentioning a time when they have struggled with the cost of prescription birth control; and

       WHEREAS, Premier health care providers and medical associations support improved access to contraception, including the American Medical Association, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American Academy of Family Physicians, the Society for Adolescent Medicine, the American Public Health Association, and the March of Dimes; now therefore be it

       RESOLVED, That we, the members of the 129th General Assembly of the State of Ohio, in adopting this resolution, strongly urge the United States Department of Health and Human Services to include all federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved prescription contraceptive drugs and devices in the list of women's preventive health care services that the Department defines as services that must be covered by new health insurance plans and are exempt from cost-sharing requirements, as provided under Section 2713 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; and be it further

       RESOLVED, That the Clerk of the Senate transmit duly authenticated copies of this resolution to the Secretary of the United States Department of Health and Human Services and the members of the Ohio Congressional Delegation.

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